Would Hydrotherapy Be an Option?

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We had a great fortune this year to rent a beach house for our summer vacation that included a handicap-accessible pool. The pool was large enough for our entire family to be in it (seven of us) but small enough that by afternoon the water temperature was around the bath-water range. While some people might consider that a disadvantage, for Lynn it was just what he needed. Coldwater tends to make his spasticity worse. Plus, Lynn is like a cold-blooded animal—he takes on the temperature of his surroundings; therefore, naturally occurring warm water was perfect for him.


Each day, we took Lynn to the pool where he hung out with us for at least an hour. I would put his arms across a buggy-board or water noodle and use that as a floatation device. The float would be in front and I would hold on from behind. While I held him, he used the buoyancy of the water to help him exercise not only his legs but also his arms and torso. It was a complete body workout that did not result in serious fatigue. It was fun and therapy at the same time. While he exercised, he was able to be part of the family activities and enjoy the time with his two-year-old grandson (who would have grown gills if we had stayed there any longer, I’m sure.)


Now that we are home again, Lynn realizes, even more, the advantages of hydrotherapy. When he saw his chiropractor this week, she commented on how much more flexibility he had than usual. She attributed that to the passive resistance of exercising in the water. Helping his exercise in the water was also easier for me. Though I had to hold onto him and even hold him up at times, the water served as a support system for the weight of his body keeping me from being as fatigued and reducing the stress impact on my own muscles. With that realization, he has begun to explore the possibility of buying an exercise pool.


The prospect of buying and installing a pool has me filled with mixed emotions, however.
The pros

  • Helping Lynn to exercise in a pool would be easier on me than the muscle stress currently occurring as I help hold, lift and otherwise move his limbs. He has very little ability to move either of his legs and can only move independently one of his arms so the effort required by me is greater than the efforts he can make alone.
  • An indoor pool in one of our spare rooms would be much handier than traveling 45-60 minutes to use a handicap-accessible, heated pool in a nearby city. It would also take a huge chunk of time out of my day. Not only would I have to be away from work for the period of time he was exercising but all the time required to go to and from the exercise location and time to get him dressed and undressed.
  • Once it was bought and paid for, we would not have monthly membership fees.
  • The exercise would certainly improve his health and well-being and most likely, my own. For me, it would also likely help my arthritis pain and muscle flexibility so it would help us both physically.

The cons

  • Exercising in a pool at home while less time than traveling to one, would add at least an hour to my schedule and maybe more when it already takes three hours to get him settled before I go to work each day now.
  • The cost of installation, house modifications, exercise and safety equipment, and a lifting device to get him into and out of the pool without assistance would cost approximately $15,000-$20,000. Not bad for an indoor pool but a lot more money than what we have lying around.
  • I’m sure there would be some kind of maintenance requirements that would add work to my already full day.
  • What if we do all this, and he gets worse or I get to where I can’t put him into the pool? Then we would have spent a ton of money on something we cannot use.

Continue reading at: http://multiplesclerosis.net/living-with-ms/hydrotherapy-option/

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