Healthcare to Homecare

Bridging the Gap
to
Care at Home

Healthcare to Homecare

Welcome to Healthcare to Homecare, also referred to as HTC. If you’re tired of searching for healthcare information, you’ve come to the right place. Healthcare to Homecare brings multiple caregiver resources to one location, saving you time, energy, and frustration.  

Consider HTH to buy your caregiver shopping mall where you can drop in and look around for just what you need to fix that problem you have with xxx. The best part about the site is that you can find answers to many questions with just a quick “look-see.” Keep reading, and I’ll share more about how you can find those answers.

Donna Steigleder

Healthcare to Homecare

Welcome to Healthcare to Homecare, also referred to as HTC. If you’re tired of searching for healthcare information, you’ve come to the right place. Healthcare to Homecare brings multiple caregiver resources to one location, saving you time, energy, and frustration.  

Consider HTH to buy your caregiver shopping mall where you can drop in and look around for just what you need to fix that problem you have with xxx. The best part about the site is that you can find answers to many questions with just a quick “look-see.” Keep reading, and I’ll share more about how you can find those answers.

Donna Steigleder

Why Visit Healthcare to HomeCare?

                                                                                                           Something for Everyone

Think of Healthcare to Homecare as a caregiver’s one-stop, shopping mall, except it’s on the internet. Each menu entry represents a separate category of HTH information in the same way a shopping mall has separate retail store inside one large building.  

After deciding which menu category, you wish to explore, click on the “learn more” button to enter the retail store/category selected. The click takes you to a “store directory” that allows you to choose the pathway you take in researching that topic area further. In some cases, you may find links to videos showing how to perform patient care procedures and in others, links to agencies providing additional information on a particular topic.

Though I provide you links, I do not validate the materials presented by them. If their information is outdated or inaccurate, I am sorry but unaware of that fact. Therefore, please consider more than one source before making any decisions based on the information you find on this site. I cannot guarantee the sources are reliable.  I am only pointing you in the direction of possible resources to help save you time and effort. If you do find something that is wrong, please let me know so I can take it down.  Thank you.

Life's Journey

Caregivers need help finding answers

Donna shares her education, training and caregiving experience along with the faith that guided her through the challenges of her life.  In the early days of helping her husband, Lynn, adjust to living with primary progressive multiple sclerosis, she wrote a weekly blog. She provides them again to allow new caregivers to see how she dealt with caregiving.  

Adapting

You’ll find yourself adapting often in your career as a caregiver. Embrace flexibility now and learn to live life one day at a time, whether dealing with a chronic or acute health condition. Either way, I’ll give you guidelines on how to look over your current life and decide what to let go, cut back, or adjust. Furthermore, we’ll look at what battles to fight and which ones to let slide so that you win the war even if you lose a few battles.

Emotions

Caregivers live a life surrounded by an emotional tornado most of the time. Some emotions boil and bubble up from within our very souls. However, we also deal with the emotions of the people under our care, family members, people offering advice, and many more. Dealing with the overwhelming bombardment of emotions coming from all directions with no apparent end in sight can lead to caregiver fatigue or burnout. Understanding the why and what to do about emotions can give you a fresh breeze from all that hot air.

Finance

Caregiving is expensive. Medicare and third-party payors (insurance companies) pay what they feel is essential for care; all else falls on the patient to pay. Items listed as “medical” devices are marked up more than the same product found in general merchandise. Federal Assistance Guidelines require a person’s assets to be less than $2,000/month (less than the national poverty level) to qualify. Furthermore, that $2,000 does not consider the applicant’s monthly expenses.

Learning

Young Adult with Muscular Dystrophy.

New caregivers may think their “brain” will short-circuit from all the information thrust upon them simultaneously. No doubt, it feels overwhelming. Most of the information provided is for reference only and is a tool to review in case you forget something. However, I expect it still feels like too much. Therefore, I’ll give you some tips on prioritizing information into essential, good-to-know, and nice-to-know categories.

Legal

Medicine is a legal minefield. It’s easy to step on a bomb before you realize you tripped a wire. Quick Disclaimer: I’m not a lawyer, have no training, and can’t represent or advise you, but I can explain the definitions of terms based on what a dictionary tells me. I can also share ways I’ve seen the law used and warnings I’ve received. In addition, caregiver family members must learn how to advocate for their rights, be familiar with a patient bill of rights, and know who to contact if they are violated. I will review that process and how to contact regulatory agencies for compliance issues if needed.

Materials

Depending on the medical condition affecting the person under your care, the material needs will differ from person to person. Even a person with the same medical condition will need different supplies if they have an additional medical complication, are overweight, older, or have a history of a genetic disorder. Medical supplies, medications, equipment, staffing agencies, construction companies to adapt your home, conversion vans, etc., all fall under materials and can make you want to pull your hair out. I’ll give you some pointers on locating resources and what to do or not do about them.

Resources

I have lists of government, local, and community resources that can help you with more information than I can provide specific to your needs. Please contact them for additional personalized help. They are there to help and are experts in their specialty. Use them.

Wellness

Doesn’t hearing the word “wellness” make you want to laugh? Who has time to take care of themselves, right? We all agree we can’t do everything wellness experts tell us to do, but some of the things they suggest can make life better. For example, getting more rest helps reduce feelings of pain and exhaustion. I’ll offer some ideas on taking care of yourself using common things you have at home and ways to incorporate activities into your lifestyle. Sometimes, making a few changes can help in big ways.

Why Visit Healthcare to HomeCare?

Something for Everyone

Think of Healthcare to Homecare as a caregiver’s one-stop, shopping mall, except it’s on the internet. Each menu entry represents a separate category of HTH information in the same way a shopping mall has separate retail store inside one large building.  

After deciding which menu category, you wish to explore, click on the “learn more” button to enter the retail store/category selected. The click takes you to a “store directory” that allows you to choose the pathway you take in researching that topic area further. In some cases, you may find links to videos showing how to perform patient care procedures and in others, links to agencies providing additional information on a particular topic.

Though I provide you links, I do not validate the materials presented by them. If their information is outdated or inaccurate, I am sorry but unaware of that fact. Therefore, please consider more than one source before making any decisions based on the information you find on this site. I cannot guarantee the sources are reliable.  I am only pointing you in the direction of possible resources to help save you time and effort. If you do find something that is wrong, please let me know so I can take it down.  Thank you.

Caregivers need help finding answers

Life's Journey

Donna shares her education, training and caregiving experience along with the faith that guided her through the challenges of her life.  In the early days of helping her husband, Lynn, adjust to living with primary progressive multiple sclerosis, she wrote a weekly blog. She provides them again to allow new caregivers to see how she dealt with caregiving.

Adapting

You’ll find yourself adapting often in your career as a caregiver. Embrace flexibility now and learn to live life one day at a time, whether dealing with a chronic or acute health condition. Either way, I’ll give you guidelines on how to look over your current life and decide what to let go, cut back, or adjust. Furthermore, we’ll look at what battles to fight and which ones to let slide so that you win the war even if you lose a few battles.

Emotions

Caregivers live a life surrounded by an emotional tornado most of the time. Some emotions boil and bubble up from within our very souls. However, we also deal with the emotions of the people under our care, family members, people offering advice, and many more. Dealing with the overwhelming bombardment of emotions coming from all directions with no apparent end in sight can lead to caregiver fatigue or burnout. Understanding the why and what to do about emotions can give you a fresh breeze from all that hot air.

Finance

Caregiving is expensive. Medicare and third-party payors (insurance companies) pay what they feel is essential for care; all else falls on the patient to pay. Items listed as “medical” devices are marked up more than the same product found in general merchandise. Federal Assistance Guidelines require a person’s assets to be less than $2,000/month (less than the national poverty level) to qualify. Furthermore, that $2,000 does not consider the applicant’s monthly expenses.

Young Adult with Muscular Dystrophy.

Learning

New caregivers may think their “brain” will short-circuit from all the information thrust upon them simultaneously. No doubt, it feels overwhelming. Most of the information provided is for reference only and is a tool to review in case you forget something. However, I expect it still feels like too much. Therefore, I’ll give you some tips on prioritizing information into essential, good-to-know, and nice-to-know categories.

Legal

Medicine is a legal minefield. It’s easy to step on a bomb before you realize you tripped a wire. Quick Disclaimer: I’m not a lawyer, have no training, and can’t represent or advise you, but I can explain the definitions of terms based on what a dictionary tells me. I can also share ways I’ve seen the law used and warnings I’ve received. In addition, caregiver family members must learn how to advocate for their rights, be familiar with a patient bill of rights, and know who to contact if they are violated. I will review that process and how to contact regulatory agencies for compliance issues if needed.

Materials

Depending on the medical condition affecting the person under your care, the material needs will differ from person to person. Even a person with the same medical condition will need different supplies if they have an additional medical complication, are overweight, older, or have a history of a genetic disorder. Medical supplies, medications, equipment, staffing agencies, construction companies to adapt your home, conversion vans, etc., all fall under materials and can make you want to pull your hair out. I’ll give you some pointers on locating resources and what to do or not do about them.

Resources

I have lists of government, local, and community resources that can help you with more information than I can provide specific to your needs. Please contact them for additional personalized help. They are there to help and are experts in their specialty. Use them.

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